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•Sedation and general anaesthesia should not be undertaken lightly.

•Anaesthetic agents are metabolised by the liver, excreted by the kidneys, and reduce vital signs such as heart and respiratory rate, and blood pressure.

•Therefore, the more that is known about your pet’s health and organ function the better.

•This is because having this information helps us to select the safest anaesthetic protocol for your pet, and allows us to uncover hidden illnesses not apparent on the clinical exam.  

•Such illnesses could compromise your pet’s health once sedated or anaesthetised, and we do not want to take any unnecessary or life-threatening risks.

•Anaemia, early liver or kidney failure, diabetes mellitus, hyperthyroidism, infections, heart disease, and pancreatitis are all part of a long list of diseases that can impact on the safety of an anaesthetic, as well as on a patient’s recovery.

•This is not a scare tactic – it is a fact.

•We owe it to you and your pet to ensure that all procedures that we put them through are as safe as possible.  

•Knowing their blood parameters helps us a great deal with this.

•Normal results are our favourite type of result, as these allow us to proceed with confidence.

•Such results also provide an ideal baseline reference from which future results can be compared.  

•That is why even testing younger patients is advisable, as we then have on file what is normal for your particular pet.  

•The cost of pre-anaesthetic blood testing is only £36 (plus 10% off if a member of our Pet Health Club).  This may have already been included in the estimate given to you by the vet.  For routine neuters (spays and castrates) it is an extra charge.  

•If results are abnormal then these will be discussed with you before proceeding, and the option of additional safety measures considered (e.g. IV fluids, or a review of the initial planned sedation/anaesthetic protocol), or further investigations might be recommended to investigate severely abnormal results.  

•If you would like any further information or guidance on the above, then please discuss these with a clinical member of staff (vet or nurse).

Pre-anaesthetic Blood Testing